Why You Might Want A Land Survey As A Homeowner

Land surveying is a service that can be used to determine exactly where a property line or boundary begins or ends. If you own a piece of property as a homeowner, there are a variety of different reasons why you might want to get an official survey of your property. Here are just some of the different scenarios that a local land surveying expert can assist you with.

Make Sure You Have the Legal Right Before Making an Addition or Adjustment to Your Home

Are you looking to make a major adjustment or renovation to your home? Perhaps you are going to create a new sunroom at the back of your house? Maybe you want to create a garden that will go right up to where you believe your neighbor's property begins? If you will be making major additions to your property by adding one or more new structures, make sure you are building where you are legally allowed to. You don't want to build, say, that sunroom, and then find out after the fact that part of it is actually located on your neighbor's property.

Stop a Property Dispute Before It Begins

Land surveying services can, of course, be contacted to resolve a property line dispute. But you can stay ahead of the game by getting a survey of your land before you actually need to. If, for example, you take a vacant lot that has additional vacant lots on each side, you can get a survey before anyone else buys the other lots to help you figure out exactly where your property begins and ends. This survey then only needs to be shown to your eventual new neighbor if the day ever goes when they have questions about the property lines. 

Ensure You Don't Violate Local Regulations

Finally, you may also want to get a professional land survey service out to your home if you are concerned at all about local regulations. For example, if there is a creek that runs just past your property, there may be a regulation that says you can't build anything within a certain distance of that creek. You might also be restricted from building near anything that runs too close to the town's sewer line. If part of your property technically runs close to public property, members of the public may have the right to walk over part of your property in order to get to the next sidewalk or other areas of public property. A land survey can spell all this out for you in detail.

For more information, check out sites like http://www.communitysciences.com.



Tags:
432 Words

Latest Posts

The Benefits of Building a Garage
13 February 2024
Are you tired of cleaning snow off your car every morning or worrying about it being damaged while parked on the street? Have you ever considered buil

Reasons Why Tiny Homes Can Lead to a Simpler, More Meaningful Life
1 February 2024
Living in a tiny home has become increasingly popular in recent years. These compact, minimalist dwellings offer unique benefits that can lead to a si

Understanding the Benefits of Helical Pilings for Commercial Foundation Repair
18 January 2024
In the world of construction, the foundation is crucial in ensuring the strength and stability of a building. Despite the best efforts of builders and

Tags